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Stockholm University

Country: Sweden

Stockholm University

361 Projects, page 1 of 73
  • Funder: EC Project Code: 101043485
    Overall Budget: 1,999,440 EURFunder Contribution: 1,999,440 EUR

    CO2 capture, storage and utilization is judged critical to mitigate the rapid rise in the atmospheric CO2 concentration. A key problem is the gigantic mass of CO2 emitted, which asks for robust, efficient and economically viable approaches that are currently missing and limited by the lack of suitable materials. To break through this barrier, I aim to develop metal-free dual-function porous poly(ionic liquid)s (DPPs) to capture and convert CO2 under ambient conditions into cyclic carbonates with high efficiency, and to apply them in model reactors for cost-effective processing of CO2. Poly(ionic liquid)s (PILs) are innovative ionic materials, in which ionic liquids (ILs) are covalently joined by a macromolecular backbone. ILs are known CO2-philes, and IL-derived PILs are naturally in favour of CO2 sorption, while their ions can be tailor-made for catalytic CO2 transformation. Such dual-function as sorbent and catalyst is the intrinsic merit of PILs to address the CO2 challenge, but unfortunately has been long impeded by the mismatched chemical structures in each function. Our preliminary work proved that the newly emerging 1,2,4-triazolium PILs were catalytic active and drastically more CO2-philic than common polyimidazoliums, and are believed as the game-changer materials. We envision that by structuring chemically tailor-made 1,2,4-triazolium PILs into highly porous materials, they will be able to capture and convert CO2 under ambient conditions. This ground-breaking materials concept will circumvent the complicated, harsh conditions for CO2 fixation, and cut the cost to an affordably low level. This project will radically advance scientific knowledge and technology to fixate and convert CO2 at scale into value-added chemicals that further reduces the consumption of fossil resources. Its outcome will expedite the research in PIL and dual-function materials to revolutionize the CCU routes and equip us with powerful materials tools to mitigate the global CO2 rise.

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  • Funder: EC Project Code: 101029198
    Overall Budget: 191,852 EURFunder Contribution: 191,852 EUR

    Plastic is an emerging environmental contaminant that attracts social, political, and scientific attention. However, the effect mechanisms and ecological conditions that promote the consequences of plastic littering remain elusive because of the single-species approach in ecotoxicological testing. To make regulatory decisions mitigating the problem, the potential impacts and vulnerable habitats must be identified. In aquatic ecosystems, macrophyte beds are often a templet habitat providing foraging grounds for pelagic and benthic food webs. These systems are also at the forefront of plastic littering, with high fragmentation and accumulation of microplastic. I propose to conduct a systematic study to understand the multiple interactions between the key components in a coastal habitat exposed to plastic littering. Using the keystone macroalgae species in the Baltic, Fucus vesiculosus, this project aims to evaluate the microplastic effect mechanisms that are related to the species interactions in seaweed beds, with a microbiome being the key component mediating these interactions as well as microplastic retention in the system. I will also investigate the potential of the macrophyte habitat as an entrance point for microplastic in the food web, with particular focus on the primary consumers with different feeding modes. To evaluate the ecosystem health posed by microplastics, the project will also examine effects of microplastic and their leachates on plant physiology, including its growth and metabolite production. Finally, I will evaluate the effects of microplastic exposure on the macrophyte templet functions, including energy transfer efficiency and heat wave resilience. This framework will provide an understanding of the pathways, fate and effects of plastic debris in macrophyte system as well as an approach that applies to other anthropogenic contaminants released into the environment as particulates.

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  • Funder: EC Project Code: 616496
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  • Funder: EC Project Code: 210405
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  • Funder: EC Project Code: 101039588
    Overall Budget: 1,499,230 EURFunder Contribution: 1,499,230 EUR

    Rapid warming is accelerating Arctic carbon cycling, including CO2 release by degradation of thawing soil organic matter and CO2 uptake by better-growing plants. Projections of future Arctic greenhouse gas fluxes retain large uncertainties and do not consider plant-soil interactions that can substantially affect CO2 release - the RHIZOSPHERE PRIMING EFFECT. Theoretical considerations, comparison of ecosystem carbon stocks and model extrapolation of temperate studies suggest a high potential for globally-relevant, priming-induced CO2 emissions from a warming Arctic following shifts in vegetation and rooting patterns. PRIMETIME aims to provide the first observation-based estimate of total plant effects on circum-Arctic soil and ecosystem carbon stocks in a changing climate. Central questions include: (1) How do different vegetation types affect soil and ecosystem carbon stocks and CO2 balance? (2) How do changes in rooting depth interact with depth gradients of soil properties to affect carbon stocks and CO2 fluxes? (3) What is the net effect of expected changes in plant productivity, vegetation distribution and rooting on ecosystem carbon storage across the circum-Arctic? The EXPERIMENTAL MODULE will quantify plant-soil carbon fluxes and plant impacts on soil CO2 release for different vegetation types and soil depths, combining a novel living-plant macrocosm experiment with field observations, cutting-edge 14C-dating (high risk) and 13C-labelling. The MODELLING MODULE will take our recent model to the next level and integrate experimental data to calculate the combined plant effect on ecosystem CO2 sink/source strength in a changing Arctic. The model will be validated against Eddy Covariance-observed CO2 fluxes (high risk). The integrated PRIMETIME approach will break new ground by shedding light on plant impacts on belowground carbon cycling, and provide a tool box to quantify and integrate these fine-scale processes in large-scale emission estimates.

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